Assault by T-Shirt

Yes, you saw it here first.

This is the tale of two men, a little girl, a manager, and a helpless server caught in the middle.

Your very own Ribeye was standing at the Micros, putting in an order when suddenly, this semi-tall weird looking man in his late 40’s comes running up to the bar, yelling at the top of his lungs, “HEY, HEY!

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20 thoughts on “Assault by T-Shirt

  1. ok, you’re going to hate me for this. BUT- I really don’t like those shirts. As a parent, it just raises questions once they can read, and I have a hard enough time controlling my language much less explaining things to little guys. Now, if the folks that wear them would remember to make sure – like your manager said – that it was appropriate for the establishment, I could care less. BUT- it’s at the mall, it’s at the grocery store.
    To each his/her own- really- but have some common sense and don’t wear it just to get attention.
    That crazy guy was out of hand, though- there are about 10 other ways he could have handled it if he were so offended.

  2. I bought my adult nephew a shirt he absolutely loved. It was a plain t-shirt, except in tiny lettering on the upper right corner it said “What are you looking at, you little fucker?”

    He wore it until it was in tatters.

  3. If you’re going to be that offended by that particular shirt, perhaps you shouldn’t be taking your niece to a bar where alcohol is served.

    Personally, I wouldn’t wear that shirt in public. That doesn’t mean no one else has the right to wear it.

  4. It’s not actually a first amendment issue – as long as he’s on private property, your business could ask him to leave, if you were so inclined.

    The first amendment only applies to government regulation, not to private citizens or businesses.

    While I have “fun” t-shirts that I happily wear in the privacy of my own home, I wouldn’t wear that particular shirt out in public. And I wouldn’t think particularly well of the kind of person who would. It’s not that cute or funny.

  5. To say that this was a Free Speech issue was deeply idiotic. Shirt-guy was wearing that shirt on private property not his own. Restaurant would have been within its rights to tell shirt-guy to get out and come back when he was properly attired (which is what I think they should have done). Yelling-guy, on the other hand, was a big jerk and should have left without the hysterics, taking contact information for your corporate office with him and complained that way, and also tell the manager on duty why he wasn’t going to spend any money there.

    Public speech just gets worse and worse every day, and shirts like that are definitely not helping.

  6. That shirt says volumes about the person wearing it, none of it good. It’s “cool” only to those without taste or class. As others have said, it’s not a free-speech issue: the manager would have been entirely within his rights to through the shirt guy out, as well as the yelling guy. He should have done both.

  7. People who wear shirts like that are losers. They have no other way to make an impression so they resort to shocking people with childish shirts.

  8. It is tacky. But, as you have witnessed first hand, people have a right tacky themselves up through attitude, language, and attire.

  9. I loved your reply regarding the fact that his niece was in a bar. I once worked in a bar that served a Sunday brunch before they made the non-smoking laws and we had a couple try to get a man to put out his cigarette because they had their infant with them. The manager explained to them that they had their infant in a bar and if they didn’t like what went on there then maybe they should be the ones to leave. Those shirts may offend some but people need to remember that if they choose to bring children to adult places they can expect to see things that aren’t G rated. There are plenty of family friendly restaurants for that very reason. The man who yelled at you was way out of line.

  10. What Mr. Garrison should have done is told his niece that the guy wearing the shirt is a very bad man because he is wearing a shirt with a very bad word on it. Good people don’t wear shirts like that and good people don’t say that very bad word.

    I would say that Mr. Garrison’s actual reaction was far and away worse than the guy’s T-shirt and would traumatize the niece more than than seeing a T-shirt with an F-bomb on it.

    I do agree that it is NOT a First Amendment issue. It is private property so there is no reason why management can’t ask someone to leave for being offensive.

    I would also agree that a BAR is not really a family restaurant, like Perkins or Shoney’s, unless it is a family of alcoholics. Yes, I read elsewhere on your site about the shenanigans that goes on behind the scenes at Shoney’s.

  11. as a social studies teacher i can only manage a sad sigh when i see people frame this as a 1st amendment issue – did no one ever explain the difference between what gov’t can make rules about and what private establishments can? Thank you Carol for cheering me up a little…and by the way, an assault by definition does not have to be physical, it is defined as a “violent attempt, or willful offer with force or violence, to do hurt to another; an attempt or OFFER to beat another, accompanied by a degree of violence, but without touching his person, as by lifting the fist, or a cane, in a threatening manner, or by striking at him, and missing him. If the blow aimed takes effect, it is a battery” (from Blackstone)

  12. 1st of all the first amendment doesn’t apply in private places like restaurants, bars, malls, or on airlines. Any business has the right to tell you to get out if they don’t like how you look. There are plenty, plenty of bars with dress codes that wouldn’t allow that t-shirt.

    2nd of all the 1st Amendment doesn’t give you the right to be an ignorant little douchebag like the “man” wearing the t-shirt. Ohhh, I have “fuck” on my shirt, I’m soooo cool and cutting edge. Grow up.

    The gentleman should have explained to his niece that the person wearing the shirt was infantile, self-centered, and a poor excuse for a human being and that some people are trash and to be ignored.

  13. Michael C. » The guy with the shirt wasn’t being an “ignorant little douchebag”, he was minding his own business with his friends, playing a game and having a drink. Mr. Garrison was the one causing the scene from the start.

  14. I think it’s an issue of hypersensitivity over something they can’t even explain. “It’s a bad word.” “Why?” “Um…just cause it is. It offends people.” “Why?” See where I’m going? If you allow the words that much control over you, then you allow the people who wear those shirts the same amount of control. There is no reason we should EVER have taboo in our speech. Many “vulgar” words are emphatic words and should not be curtailed from speech due to someone else’s own sensitivity. When someone can give a compelling argument why such words should be striken from public vernacular, then maybe this issue would matter. But until then, if you don’t want want your children knowing bad language…don’t take them around people. As a parent or guardian YOU are responsible for your child’s/ward’s upbringing, not everyone else. “What does fuck mean?” “Who the fuck cares?”

  15. Obviously, “Mr. Garrison” was way out of line from beginning to end. That doesn’t change the fact that the tee shirt in question was obnoxious in the extreme. I would have no problem with a tee shirt that said, for instance, “Fuck George Bush,” because it is expressing a political opinion. A “Fuck You” shirt is a whole different story, as it is intended to affront and annoy everyone who sees it for no good reason.

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